Posts Tagged ‘Mitt Romney’

Mitt Romney gives a brutal PowerPoint critique of Obama’s foreign policy

Ever since Mitt Romney’s loss to President Obama in 2012, it has become a mantra in the Republican Party that on foreign policy especially, “Romney was right.”

In a stuffy mountain lodge here Friday night, Romney joined the chorus. Dusting off a page from his management consulting playbook, the former Republican nominee delivered a speech by PowerPoint to more than 200 corporate CEOs and other attendees of his annual ideas festival about what he deemed (and titled his slides): “The Most Consequential Obama Foreign Policy Mistakes.”

Slide by slide, Romney ticked through 20 mistakes, from Obama’s “Middle East apology tour” to the president’s lack of support for Iran’s green revolution to the administration’s infamous “reset” with Russia.

Read more by Philip Rucker and Robert Costa at WashingtonPost.com

30 Reasons To Dislike Barack Obama

As a conservative, picking out things you don’t like about Barack Obama is kind of like pointing to the wettest part of the ocean. It also goes beyond politics. Not only is Barack Obama wrong politically, he’s not a good guy, “cool,” or even moderately likable. To the contrary, he’s one of the nastiest, least admirable people in politics and he gets by based on a phony persona he created when he ran for President in 2008 — along with the help of press corps liberals that work to protect him like they’re on his payroll. Based on his performance and his personality, Barack Obama deserves to be the least popular man ever to sit in the White House.

1) Nobody but an ass would say, “It’s very rare that I come to an event where I’m like the fifth- or sixth-most interesting person.”

2) He’s a former (maybe, who really knows?) coke-snorting pothead who governs with all the care and due diligence you’d expect from a coke-snorting pothead.

3) Barack Obama actually said, “The private sector is doing fine.” Given that the private sector has never at any point been doing fine since he became President, he’d have to be dumb, dishonest or delusional to say something like that.

4) He is a bigger liar than Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter put together. There’s nothing the man says you can count on his meaning unless he’s saying something nice about himself.

5) He’s made racist comments about white people. Just to name one example, . . .

Read more by John Hawkins (from 2013) at TownHall.com

Wisconsin, Politics and Faith Bind Scott Walker and Paul Ryan

Who could have guessed in the mid-1980s, at a pair of otherwise forgettable McDonald’s restaurants some 20 miles apart, that two bushy-haired teenagers working the burger grills would become Wisconsin’s most powerful Republicans?

Scott Walker, 47, now the governor and a likely presidential candidate, was a record-setting track star with a mean mullet when he donned the McDonald’s uniform — black pants, white shirt, long black tie — to make Big Macs here in his hometown.

Paul D. Ryan, 45, now a powerful United States representative who was the Republican vice-presidential candidate in 2012, suited up with something greater in mind in nearby Janesville: operating the front register. One dark day, though, Mr. Ryan’s manager told him that he lacked the “interpersonal skills” to deal with customers — and into the kitchen he went.

Mr. Walker tells that story of a young Mr. Ryan to virtually every Republican crowd he meets as he prepares for his campaign for president, sprinkling his biography with some of the gold dust Mr. Ryan has accrued as a favorite of conservatives — and as the better-known name, from his three months as Mitt Romney’s running mate.

Read more by PATRICK HEALY and JONATHAN MARTIN at NYtimes.com

The Opposition Takes Notice of Scott Walker

The smears against Romney at least occurred during the actual campaign.

One of the low points of the 2012 presidential campaign came from a spate of news stories about Mitt Romney’s alleged bullying of a college roommate. The Left would not allow the allegation to die, and Romney was finally forced to issue a public apology for what he rightly termed “high school pranks that may have hurt others,” as though this had any relevance or bearing on his fitness to serve as president of the United States.

At least in Romney’s case, they waited until there was actually a campaign.

Read more by Avner Zarmi at PJmedia.com

Memo To Reince: Enough is Enough. Boycott NBC and ABC

During a 2012 Republican primary debate, George Stephanopoulos asked Mitt Romney an obviously slanted if not altogether planted question about banning birth control. This mystified Romney since he had never even considered the issue as part of his platform. No major Republican had. But Stephanopoulos raised the issue and because of it, the GOP was forced to fight a two-year-long, imaginary “war on women.”

This talking point was later used by David Gregory on “Meet the Press” against Todd Akin whom handled it less articulately than Romney. But the fault in that did not lie with Stephanopoulos; it rested solely at the feet of the RNC for approving a former Clinton White House operative and still loyal Clinton acolyte to moderate a GOP debate.

Whomever was in charge and agreed to that decision should be exiled to somewhere very far and very cold where only Sarah Palin can see them from her house.

Read more by Stephen Miller at Ricochet.com

Top Ten Things Obama Has Not Released

As the Obama campaign and the media continue to press Mitt Romney to release more of his tax returns, and to suggest–without a shred of evidence–that he is a “felon,” it is worth noting how much critical information Barack Obama has withheld from view–both as a candidate in 2008, and during his term in office. Here is a Breitbart News top ten list of things that Obama has refused to release (a complete list would fill volumes):

10. State senate papers. . . .

Read more by Joel B. Pollak at breitbart.com

Paul Ryan: crony capitalism isn’t a side effect; it’s a direct result of big government

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., warned members of his party that big business can be just as corrosive as big government Tuesday in a Capitol Hill speech that strayed from GOP orthodoxy and sought to outline a new path forward for conservatism.

“There’s another fallacy popular among our ranks,” Ryan said at Hillsdale College’s Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship.”Just as some think anything government does is wrong, others think anything business does is right. But in fact they’re two sides of the same coin. Both big government and big business like to stack the deck in their favor. And though they are sometimes adversaries, they are far too often allies.”

Read more by David Catanese at RightWisconsin.com

Obama has shown how a future GOP president can gut Obamacare

I owe Mitt Romney an apology.

During the 2012 Republican presidential primary season, I repeatedly criticized Romney — and personally challenged him during his editorial board meeting with the Washington Examiner — for promising that if elected, on day one of his presidency, he would grant Obamacare waivers to all 50 states.

As I reported, under the text of the law, the ability to offer waivers to states was subject to many restrictions and wouldn’t even be an option until 2017, four years after his hypothetical swearing in.

Though I still believe I was right about what the statute said, as it turns out, I was being old-fashioned by taking the letter of the law so literally.

Read more by Philip Klein at WashingtonExaminer.com

Scott Walker, Wisconsin’s Action Governor

In 2011, thousands of government employees and others, enraged by Gov. Scott Walker’s determination to break the ruinously expensive and paralyzing grip that government workers’ unions had on Wisconsin, took over the capitol building in Madison. With chanting, screaming and singing supplemented by bullhorns, bagpipes and drum circles, their cacophony shook the building that the squalor of their occupation made malodorous. They spat on Republican legislators and urinated on Walker’s office door. They shouted, “This is what democracy looks like!

When they and Democratic legislators failed to prevent passage of Act 10, they tried to defeat — with a scurrilous smear campaign that backfired — an elected state Supreme Court justice. They hoped that changing the court’s composition would get Walker’s reforms overturned. When this failed, they tried to capture the state Senate by recalling six Republican senators. When this failed, they tried to recall Walker. On the night that failed — he won with a larger margin than he had received when elected 19 months earlier — he resisted the temptation to proclaim, “This is what democracy looks like!”

Read more by George Will at WashingtonPost.com

An Obama voter’s cry of despair

CNN Editor’s note: Nathaniel P. Morris is a second-year student at Harvard Medical School.

I’m reading a terribly sad book these days. It’s a book that I thought would uplift me during the doldrums of second-year medical school, and renew in me a sense of hope. It’s called “The Audacity to Win,” and it’s a memoir of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign.

When I’m finished with my patient write-ups at night and get into bed, the book returns me to a time when politics inspired millions and speeches could take your breath away. The election turned out to be a landslide, and news anchors paused to reflect on the historic nature of the hour.

My classmates cried with joy, and my parents saved every newspaper they could find. A young team of visionaries was headed for the White House, and the nation was ready for change. During Obama’s transition to office in 2008, he had an 82% approval rating. There was something in the air.

And then I close the book.

Read more by Nathaniel P. Morris, Special to CNN.com

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